FYI: 10 State Constitutional Amendments on This Year's Ballot

Date: October 14, 2022

Issues range from broadband expansion to property taxes

There are 10 proposed state constitutional amendments on this year’s ballot. NFIB hasn’t taken a position on any of the proposed amendments.

The secretary of state’s office has posted a statement on all 10 proposed amendments that includes the language that will appear on the ballot as well as information about each amendment’s sponsors, “a plain language summary,” and what, if anything, the amendment will cost to enact.

Proposed amendments that may be of interest to small business owners:

Amendment 2

How it appears on the ballot: “Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, to authorize the state, a county, or a municipality to grant federal award funds or any other source of funding designated for broadband infrastructure by state law to public or private entities for providing or expanding broadband infrastructure.”

Plain language summary: “This amendment will make clear that the state, a county, or a city/town may grant federal funds or other state funding to any public or private organization to expand access to high-speed Internet (broadband). If the majority of the voters vote ‘yes’ on Amendment 2, it will be clear that the state, a county, or a city/town will be allowed to grant federal funds or other state funding to any public or private organization to expand access to high-speed Internet (broadband). If the majority of the voters vote ‘no’ on Amendment 2, the state, a county, or a city/town may not be allowed to grant federal funds or other state funding to any public or private organization to expand access to high-speed Internet (broadband). There are no costs to Amendment 2.”

Amendment 6

How it appears on the ballot: “Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, as amended, each municipality authorized under Amendment No. 8 to the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, now appearing Section 216.01 of the Recompiled Constitution of Alabama of 1901, as amended, to levy and collect the ad valorem tax pursuant to Amendment No. 8 for the purpose of paying bonds and the interest thereon, and may also levy and collect such ad valorem tax and utilize such funds for capital improvements on a pay-as-you-go basis at a rate not exceeding the rate then lawfully permitted for the municipality to directly pay the costs of public capital improvements, as well as to pay the principal and interest on bonds, warrants, or other securities issued to finance or refinance the costs of the improvements; and to ratify, validate, and confirm the levy and collection of such tax levied and collected for any of these purposes prior to the ratification of this amendment.”

Plain language summary: “This amendment provides that cities/towns already allowed to collect a special property tax may use those tax dollars to directly “pay-as-you-go” for construction projects instead of going into debt. If the majority of the voters vote ‘yes’ on Amendment 6, ‘pay-as-you-go’ will be allowed. If the majority of the voters vote ‘no’ on Amendment 6, ‘pay-as-you-go’ will not be allowed. There are no costs to Amendment 6.”

Amendment 7

How it appears on the ballot: “Proposing an amendment to revise Amendment 772 to the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, as amended, to specify that all counties and municipalities may exercise the authority and powers granted by Amendment 772 to provide for economic and industrial development; to permit notice for Amendment 772 projects to be published in any newspaper in circulation in the county or municipality; and to ratify all actions and agreements of any county or municipality done under Amendment 772 unless subject to pending judicial proceedings on the date of adoption of this amendment.”

Plain language summary: “Currently, the Alabama Constitution provides that some counties and cities/towns may use public funds to sell public property, lend their credit, or become indebted for economic development purposes. Amendment 7 will give all counties and cities/towns those same powers. Currently, the governing body is required to give notice of its proposed action in the newspaper having the largest circulation in the county or city/town. Amendment 7 will allow the public notice to be given in any newspaper in circulation in the county or city/town. If the majority of the voters vote ‘yes’ on Amendment 7, the Alabama Constitution will be changed. If the majority of the voters vote ‘no’ on Amendment 7, the Alabama Constitution will not be changed. There are no costs to Amendment 7.”

Click here to read the secretary of state’s statement on all 10 proposed amendments.

 

 

 

Related Content: Small Business News | Alabama

Subscribe For Free News And Tips

Enter your email to get FREE small business insights. Learn more

Get to know NFIB

NFIB is a member-driven organization advocating on behalf of small and independent businesses nationwide.

Learn More

Or call us today
1-800-634-2669

© 2001 - 2022 National Federation of Independent Business. All Rights Reserved. Terms and Conditions | Privacy