Business Groups Challenge Recent Approved Paid Leave Revision

Date: November 05, 2019

Related Content: News Economy Labor Paid Leave Texas

Paid leave heads back to court.

In October, the San Antonio City Council voted 8-3 in favor of approving revisions to the paid sick leave ordinance passed last year, but the measure may soon be challenged in court. 

The original ordinance required that employers provide one hour of earned sick time for every 30 hours worked, with a yearly cap of 48 hours for small employers and 64 hours for those with more than 15 employees. 

The newly approved ordinance amendment requires that employers provide the one hour of earned sick time for every 30 hours worked, but with a yearly cap of 56 hours for all employers, regardless of business size.

The Rivard Report reports that business groups are moving forward with plans to request a temporary injunction to delay the measure. The hearing is scheduled Nov. 7. 

As a representative of the small businesses in Texas that would be affected, NFIB has challenged the unconstitutional, mandatory paid leave ordinances in San Antonio, Austin, and Dallas.

“Our small business members agree with the attorney general that employment regulations should be set by the Legislature and applied evenly statewide,” said NFIB’s Texas State Director Annie Spilman earlier this year regarding the San Antonio ordinance. “When local governments impose rules that go beyond what the state already requires, it creates a patchwork of confusing and contradictory mandates that make it hard for small businesses to follow the law,” Spilman said.

Related Content: News | Economy | Labor | Paid Leave | Texas

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