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No "Unsession" for Minnesota Small Businesses

Date: May 28, 2014

St. Paul (May 28, 2014) – Governor Dayton’s “Unsession,” which he billed as a project to dump silly and unnecessary laws, undermined its own progress with two hugely damaging pieces of legislation that will hurt small businesses and the state’s economy, said the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) today.

 

“While the theme of 2014 was to eliminate laws we don’t need, the Governor’s ‘Unsession’ included several negative bills that will drive up labor costs and increase liability for small businesses,” said State Director Mike Hickey

 

Hickey said the higher minimum wage, which increases labor costs for small employers every year, and the expansion of the state Human Rights Act to include every parent with children under 18 as part of a protected class who can now sue their employers with the advantages of the Human Rights Act will put a damper on small businesses for many years into the future.

 

“We have a hard time figuring out how passing a dramatic increase in the minimum wage and creating new ways to sue small businesses fits into an ‘Unsession,’” said Hickey.  “These are negative provisions that drive up costs and increase employer liability.”

 

Hickey noted the dramatic expansion of the state’s Human Rights Act that will include familial status as a new protected class was especially troubling. 

 

“We just made a significant portion of the population (workers with children under 18) a new protected class and we think it was absolutely irresponsible and unworkable,” he said.

 

Hickey applauded the repeal of several new taxes but said those measures simply undid bad tax policies that should not have been adopted in the first place.  He also noted significant progress on the general estate tax issue and said that some improvements were made to the process for getting permits approved for development.

 

Click here to read NFIB’s assessment of the 2014 Legislative Session.

 

For more information about NFIB, please visit www.nfib.com.

 

 

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