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From the 2013 Session of the Legislature

Author: Tony Malandra Date: June 13, 2013

Won across-the-board income tax reductions
NFIB/North Dakota helped win passage of legislation reducing individual income tax rates by an additional 19.3 percent ($200 million in savings over two years) and state corporate income tax rates by 12 percent ($50 million over two years).

Won further property tax reductions
NFIB/North Dakota supported legislation that will further reduce property taxes on top of significant reductions passed in 2009 and 2011. North Dakota property owners will see their property taxes reduced by an additional 20 percent on their November 2013 property tax bills.

Passed Workers’ Compensation reforms to reduce rates
Enacted workers’ compensation reforms to define pain as a symptom and not a substantial acceleration or substantial worsening of a pre-existing injury, disease or other condition. This will help limit inappropriate claims that drive up workers compensation rates.

Successfully defeated Big Labor by enacting a prohibition on Project Labor Agreements (PLAs) in North Dakota
A PLA is a pre-hire collective bargaining agreement with one or more labor union that establishes the terms and conditions of employment for a specific construction project. PLAs shut out small business non-union contractors from bidding on such projects.

Obtained new tort reform law shortening filing periods
Of all the worries small businesses have just running a daily operation, a frivolous lawsuit is the joker in the deck that can shutter an enterprise for good. That’s why NFIB will always push for tort reform aimed at reducing this unexpected worry. This year, NFIB helped win a law shortening the period for filing cases, for both general damages and personal-injury claims, from the current six-year statute of limitations to three years. Not only will this dampen lawsuit abuse, it could also lead to lower insurance premiums as well.

Secured new property rights law against trespassing
NFIB advocated for the passage of a new property-rights law that says owners or lessees of land don’t owe a duty of care to an adult trespasser and are not subject to liability for any injury to an adult trespasser.

 

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