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Employee Productivity Peaks on Tuesdays

Author: Ashley Post Date: March 17, 2014

Here’s how to keep them working hard all week.

We all know there are certain days of the week when workers aren’t firing on all cylinders. But on what day are they most productive?

Thirty-nine percent of human resources mangers say employees are generally the most productive on Tuesdays, according to a survey from staffing service Accountemps, a Robert Half Company. Mondays and Wednesdays took the second and third spots, respectively, while Thursdays and Fridays tied for the least productive days of the week.

“Many workers spend Monday catching up from the previous week and planning the one ahead,” says Max Messmer, chairman of Accountemps. “On Tuesday, employees may begin to have time to focus on individual tasks and become more productive. The goal should be to maintain the positive momentum established on Tuesday throughout the week.”

Time of day is also an important factor when it comes to employee productivity.  According to Accountemps’ previous productivity survey in 2010, employees are most productive between 10 a.m. and noon. They’re least productive from 4 to 6 p.m.

To maximize your employees’ productivity, clearly define your business’ processes. “Having systems in place is key to employee learning, training and executing effectively,” says Cathy Sexton, productivity strategist and owner of The Productivity Experts in St. Louis, a company that provides productivity coaching, training and organizing services.

Sexton also says leaders should recognize their employees’ natural productivity styles to understand how they work best. “By not micromanaging employees, you can improve productivity, attitude and create results faster,” she says.

Something as simple as ordering pizza can keep employees motivated.

Andy Crestodina, co-founder and strategic director at Chicago Web design firm Orbit  Media, has another creative tip for keeping employees engaged and focused: Order pizza.

“Having half the company walk out the door and go their separate ways to find lunch really isn’t ideal when you think about it,” he says. “If you can have lunch brought in, people will stick around, eat together and stay closer to the work and the projects. Sure, there’s a cost to it, but when we do the math, it makes sense. We have lunch brought in at least once every week or two.”

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